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A Typical Day for a Montessori Student

As a parent, choosing the right kind of education for your child can be difficult, so learning about your options is important. One of the great things about Montessori school is their students have extra support for reaching their full potential. Montessori educators understand that each child is different and learn at their own pace and in their own way. With individualized attention, this method encourages confidence and success in each academic area. If you were to observe a typical day in a Montessori classroom, you’d see an inviting and comfortable alternative learning environment, geared specifically towards young, developing minds.
Montessori Student

The Classroom

The classroom is where your child will spend most of their time. The Montessori classroom is very different when compared to traditional classrooms, offering a more child-centered learning environment. Here are some things you can expect to see each day:

Organization. Montessori classrooms are naturally lit and well organized. The learning space remains uncluttered and soft colors provide a calm environment. Materials are easily accessible, giving students’ independence as they move through their daily activities.

Nurturing. Infants are made to feel safe through nurture and acceptance. Basic needs such as eating, sleeping, and bathing are all given their own space which allows for security within a routine.

Toddler Learning. Toddlers enjoy art and learning materials within reach and eye level. This promotes motor skill development as well as independence. These smaller children are gently urged to interact with their peers and develop basic social skills.

Pre-School Learning. Pre-school age students follow a simple curriculum of numbers, shapes, and basic writing skills. Small chores shared in the classroom teach self- discipline and respect for their environment.

Primary Learning. The education of primary-age students is similar to pre-school while gently encouraging children to move to the next level. A hands-on approach to learning promotes self-esteem and keeps the school day interesting. A variety of enrichment programs are available at many Montessori schools, including science, dance, art, and music.

Student-Teacher Interaction

Montessori teachers are highly trained in child development and education. Each teacher utilizes the Montessori teaching style to its fullest potential. Your child can expect:

Individualized attention. You will not find our teachers in the traditional position in the front of the classroom, but instead interacting with the students one-on-one. Your child is directed towards activities that suit their developmental needs and given encouragement to do for themselves.

Working in groups. Children often work in small groups, helping one another learn and complete tasks. This promotes social development, especially team-building skills. The teacher observes the group and helps students when needed.

Continued growth. Classrooms are thoughtfully constructed and continue to develop throughout the year to meet the individual need of each child. Our teachers educate beyond reading, writing, and math. Cognitive, emotional, and social development plays just as big a part in a typical school day.

There are so many things to consider when it comes to the education of your child. All of these elements combined are why Montessori style teaching truly is education that transforms lives.

November 15th, 2017

Posted In: Montessori Educators

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Do Montessori Kids do Homework?

Do Montessori Kids do Homework

Montessori students are not typically assigned homework. Montessori educators do not believe in dictating the work of their students at home, instead reserving that time for family, relaxation, and the child’s own interests. There are many benefits of a no homework policy, as well as alternatives that allow children to continue learning while home.

The Benefits of Homework-Free Time

Children spend all day learning with the help of their peers and teacher. The last thing they should be worried about when they get home is hours of school work to complete. A no homework policy makes education more fulfilling rather than stressful. Some key points to consider are:

  • Kids require wind down time. If children can come home and relax, they are more likely to return to school refreshed and ready to challenge themselves. Homework can often cause burn out, affecting the child’s ability to enjoy life inside and outside of the classroom.
  • Family bonding time is crucial to development. Lack of homework creates more time for families to spend together. This enhances social skills, confidence, and behavior.
  • Children need time to pursue their own interests. Some of the time left over after school should be spent on hobbies or extracurricular activities such as music or dance. You can get an understanding of your child’s interests by watching them and asking questions.

Alternative Homework Activities

Kids have a natural desire to learn, absorbing information everywhere they go and from everything they do. Although they may not be completing traditional assignments, there are still many things they can learn at home.

  • Household chores as homework. Education goes far beyond reading, writing, and math. Children must also learn how to care for themselves. Allowing your child to help around the house promotes social skills and independence.
  • Making math out of household activities. Pairing socks and cutting food items into equal pieces are a good example of this concept. Your child can also help with shopping and making change.
  • Read together frequently. Reading to your child often helps to hone their language skills. If your child is of reading age, take turns reading books to each other each night.

Montessori schools generally avoid homework for the benefit your child, but that doesn’t mean your child’s education will come to a stop at the end of each school day. You can teach your child a variety of things by spending time together. This quality time may not be available if your child is busy with homework.

January 25th, 2017

Posted In: Montessori, Montessori Educators

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