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Hands-On Learning the Montessori Way

Hands-On Learning the Montessori Way
In a traditional classroom setting, children sit at their desks, listen to the teacher, and receive instructions. Montessori students are encouraged to learn with a much more hands-on approach. Instead of sitting and learning with paper and pencil assignments, children have free reign over a classroom with a variety of educational activities at their disposal. Working with their hands gives children a solid understanding of the learning materials, and information is absorbed more effectively.

Hands-On Learning in the Classroom

Children tend to learn better when they are completing tasks on their own rather than receiving constant instruction. When kids learn using their hands, the lesson is effortlessly committed to memory instead of relying on verbal or written repetition. The Montessori hands-on experience can be applied by using:

  • Sensory materials. Learning materials with a variety of textures and colors help children make a connection between their hands and their brain. For example, letters cut out of sand paper give a physical feeling to learning the alphabet.
  • Moveable activities. Instead of sitting at a desk, children move around the classroom and choose from a variety of activities. They can take their activity to a table, chair, or floor mat to explore their materials.
  • Enticing assignments. Hands-on learning keeps children interested and focused on the lesson at hand. A movable alphabet that they can touch and feel is more entertaining than a simple worksheet. Similarly, learning to count by manipulating rods and beads is more interesting than being told how to count to ten over and over.

Practical Life Skills Through Hands-On Learning

Children learn most from what they see; they learn better by copying the actions of others rather than being told what to do. Your child will learn much more by working alongside an adult than being given instructions from afar. A few ways to apply this concept are:

  • Cleanup time. Children love to do simple chores like sweeping, wiping tables, and cleaning up messes side by side with a parent or teacher. This way, children can use their hands in a productive way, gaining a sense of accomplishment.
  • Snack time. Preparing small snacks or pouring drinks for themselves establishes confidence and encourages independence. Simple tasks like these also promote hand strength and enhance motor skills.

January 30th, 2017

Posted In: Montessori

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