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How Montessori Education Creates Strong Children

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A Montessori learning environment is focused on each child as an individual. In a traditional classroom, children are seen as a group and are all taught the same way. No kid learns the same as the other or is on the same developmental wavelength. Montessori education allows students to draw upon their strengths, hone their weaknesses, and build character in a rich and supportive fashion. Montessori children are built from the ground up to be successful and strong.

Muti-Age Grouping

In the real, adult world, people are not lumped with peers of only their age group. This concept is transferred to the Montessori classroom. Age groups in these classes usually have a three-year range. The benefits of this are astounding. Older children learn from teaching the younger and younger children learn from example. Young kids are ready and willing to gain knowledge from the older peers they look up too. Older kids recognize gaps in their knowledge through teaching. Older students also gain a sense of pride and strength when helping others learn. Montessori children function more like a family or a community than a traditional education setting.

Encouraging Independence

Montessori children are encouraged to be independent in all they do. The Montessori classroom is designed to make that possible. Furniture is sized to fit small children and all materials are within their grasp. You won’t see a student working at a small desk with only a sheet of paper and a pencil. On the contrary, child-sized chairs, tables, and floor mats let students pick where is most comfortable for them to learn. They have a wide array of materials and activities that they can choose from, independently. Even better than that, Montessori learning activities are designed to be self-correcting. Students can see mistakes and easily correct them themselves and gain knowledge in the process.

Montessori Educators

Montessori teachers do not stand in the front of the room giving orders or stay at their desks while students complete work. Teachers move around the classroom giving guidance when needed and keeping a watchful eye on each child and their development. Montessori educators have a relationship with each child and help them learn in ways that suit them individually. Here, teachers are not dictators, but nurturers; helping each child draw strength from within themselves and grow into the best person they can be.

A Montessori education is not designed to run a mill of children, punching out the best test scores. This is education focused on the future; providing life skills, lessons, and tools that give each child the best chance at a rich education and a fulfilling life after school.

May 29th, 2017

Posted In: About Montessori Education

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Do Montessori Kids do Homework?

Do Montessori Kids do Homework

Montessori students are not typically assigned homework. Montessori educators do not believe in dictating the work of their students at home, instead reserving that time for family, relaxation, and the child’s own interests. There are many benefits of a no homework policy, as well as alternatives that allow children to continue learning while home.

The Benefits of Homework-Free Time

Children spend all day learning with the help of their peers and teacher. The last thing they should be worried about when they get home is hours of school work to complete. A no homework policy makes education more fulfilling rather than stressful. Some key points to consider are:

  • Kids require wind down time. If children can come home and relax, they are more likely to return to school refreshed and ready to challenge themselves. Homework can often cause burn out, affecting the child’s ability to enjoy life inside and outside of the classroom.
  • Family bonding time is crucial to development. Lack of homework creates more time for families to spend together. This enhances social skills, confidence, and behavior.
  • Children need time to pursue their own interests. Some of the time left over after school should be spent on hobbies or extracurricular activities such as music or dance. You can get an understanding of your child’s interests by watching them and asking questions.

Alternative Homework Activities

Kids have a natural desire to learn, absorbing information everywhere they go and from everything they do. Although they may not be completing traditional assignments, there are still many things they can learn at home.

  • Household chores as homework. Education goes far beyond reading, writing, and math. Children must also learn how to care for themselves. Allowing your child to help around the house promotes social skills and independence.
  • Making math out of household activities. Pairing socks and cutting food items into equal pieces are a good example of this concept. Your child can also help with shopping and making change.
  • Read together frequently. Reading to your child often helps to hone their language skills. If your child is of reading age, take turns reading books to each other each night.

Montessori schools generally avoid homework for the benefit your child, but that doesn’t mean your child’s education will come to a stop at the end of each school day. You can teach your child a variety of things by spending time together. This quality time may not be available if your child is busy with homework.

January 25th, 2017

Posted In: Montessori, Montessori Educators

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